Plausible deniability

Sometimes when I am truly honest, I must admit that the most manipulative, sneaky person I know is me. There is something in the fallen part of my nature—the part of me that the Bible calls the flesh—that is constantly on the lookout for plausible deniability. I want to be able to plead my innocence or insist that I didn’t really know what I was saying or doing, even when I actually did. I want to find ways to justify myself.

This isn’t always the case of course. There are parts of me that genuinely want to be honest, consistent, and good. There is a side to me that wants to honor God and do what is right before Him, but then there is another side that wants to preserve my rights or defend my pride at all costs. Sometimes, even if I know I am a party to some unbecoming decision or action, I will arrange for some plausible deniability.

The flesh always wants plausible deniability. The flesh always wants to appear more humble than it really is. The flesh wants to be seen as innocent or pure when there might be other passions at work on the inside. In contrast to this, the Scriptures call us to truth in our inward being (Psalm 51:6 KJV).

Let’s put plausible deniability on trial in our lives. Let’s renounce any posturing, posing, or pretending to be more legitimate than we really are. Let’s push for authenticity and honesty, even if it hurts a little bit. Authentic, truth-based lives are the lives that God can truly build on. These are the lives that can stand strong for a lifetime. A fleshly plausible deniability creates cracks in our character, hairline fractures in our integrity that can lead to future breakdowns. Let’s avoid that. Let’s insist on truth so we can stand firm to the end.

Behold, You desire truth in the inward parts, and in the hidden part You will make me to know wisdom…The sacrifices of God are a broken spirit, a broken and a contrite heart—these, O God, You will not despise.” (Psalm 51:6, 17 NKJV)

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